Discovering our homes

 

In Colab 2 we, as a group responded to the brief in a very literal way. We immediately started to look at our immediate habitats i.e. our bedrooms and living spaces. Individually we all went of and researched this in our own distinct way. This gave as multiple insights to develop over the remainder of their project, so therefore we chose to deliver our work in 20 images. Each responsible for 5 images each, we feel our work illustrates how differently we responded to the brief with still keeping our immediate habitats in the forefront of our minds. 

See Also

The contradiction between industry and Nature

 

While walking around our sites, significant impacts from the industrial revolution can be found. Due to urban development, Industries are devouring nature. We had interviews with people around the site. Interestingly, our first impressions vary from what people think about the space. The attractiveness of Speirs Wharf underlines the loneliness of port Dundas. Therefore, our group aimed to highlight the differences between the two areas, capturing people’s different conflicts towards the site. At the end of the day, human still relies on nature as escapism. But can we maintain the balance in between?

See Also

Daily routine Animation

When the topic of ‘Our Habitat’ came up, we thought of many things. As a group, we wanted to focus on how we live in our habitat, as we all have different daily lives, so we tried to focus on our own daily routines and later we tried to make a series of collages and models. Finally, as a team, we created a short animation to show our ideas about habitats.

See Also

‘An Underwater Glasgow’ by Group

 

A thriving modern-day city, Glasgow provides an urban habitat for over 600,000 people. Originally brought together by the community’s shared use of the River Clyde, the city supported Scotland’s largest shipbuilding industry. However, due to the growing climate crisis, the life giver of the city will soon become the life taker – caused by the rising river levels, parts of the city will be drowned in the next 30 years. To prevent this, we are collaborating to highlight to the public the impending flooding that will destroy most of the city. Through mapping and investigating the climate emergency we hope to make a striking statement using installations along the riverside.

See Also

A journey through sound

 

By investigating noise pollution and the Anthropocene, we will investigate the impact on human existence in our habitat, exploring daily noise pollution. We will do this by creating a strong representation of the sounds we hear, using audio recordings and placing them over a simple three-dimensional model. Our final design concept is embarking on a journey starting with quiet, natural sounds in a suburban landscape and culminating with the unbearable loudness of man-made urban noise through an immersive experience. We hope to illustrate the damaging effect that noise pollution has on people both personally, environmentally and on a wider level.

See Also

Barriers; Physical and Non-Physical

 

 We began to explore the idea of barriers through our workshop with Tessa lynch. We decided to focus on the human condition and the futility of barriers, both physical and non-physical. We staged a photo shoot in the middle of Sauchiehall street to see how many people would obey the non-physical barrier. We looked at the act of graffiti and how those artists seek out barriers to break in order to create. From here, we began to develop a satirical instruction manual on “how to break barriers”. This manual relates to breaking visible, physical barriers and invisible, non-physical barriers; This represents the futility of barriers and further highlights the absurdity of human conditioning. The overall theme focuses on the human condition and absurdity in the Anthropocene.

See Also

Exploration of Rivers

Water reunites us, both physically and metaphorically. Despite being speckled across Glasgow, each of us was close to a river or canal, with its one history and unique relationship to ourselves. Taking inspiration from Neil McGuire’s Then and Now we decided to focus specifically on rivers. Water is timeless and ever-connected, so how could each of us explore it as our habitat, and what are the historical and societal implications? As a response we each made a video with “river” as our subject, including thoughtful audio. Through collaboration and research, we have created a small collection with each of our videos representing a small chapter of the bigger picture.

See Also